It’s not the one-child policy, repeated correction edition

The Washington Post has a poignant story about elderly parents in China whose lives are disrupted by the deaths of their only children. In a society with low fertility, an inadequate pension system, and a high cultural value on generational legacies, this loss is often devastating. And for those who wanted to have more children, but were prevented from doing so by China’s repressive one-child policy, the suffering is more acute, resulting in anger directed toward the state.

I wish, however, that American media would stop unquestioningly attributing China’s low fertility rate to the one-child policy. The Post‘s William Wan writes:

For more than three decades, debate has raged over China’s one-child policy, imposed in 1979 to rein in runaway population growth. It has reshaped Chinese society — with birthrates plunging from 4.77 children per woman in the early 1970s to 1.64 in 2011, according to estimates by the United Nations — and contributed to the world’s most unbalanced sex ratio at birth, with baby boys far outnumbering girls.

That’s an odd paragraph, because it notes the policy was implemented in 1979 (it was actually 1980), and then compares fertility rates in the “early 1970s” to the present. Isn’t the more reasonable comparison to 1980? The data are available:

Source: World Bank or United Nations.

The drop from 2.6 in 1980 to 1.6 or so today is important (although of course it can’t all be attributed to the policy). But the “plunge” from 4.77 was mostly before the policy took hold.

A recent paper by Wang Feng, Yong Cai, and Baochang Gu considers the common claim that the one-child policy averted 400 million births. They write:

In stating that the one-child policy averted 400 million births, the promoters of the policy first misinterpreted the original results from the study mentioned above. The number of births averted was for the period since 1970, not from 1980, when the one-child policy was formally implemented nationwide. This mistake is crucial because most of China’s fertility transition was completed during the decade of the 1970s—that is, before China’s one-child policy was enacted. Within that decade, China’s total fertility rate dropped by more than half, from 5.8 in 1970 to 2.8 in 1979. Most of the births averted, if any, were due to the rapid fertility decline of that decade, not to the one-child policy that came afterward.

Dear American news media: Please make a note of a it.

3 Comments

Filed under In the news, Research reports

3 responses to “It’s not the one-child policy, repeated correction edition

  1. Ness Blackbird

    In fact — just reading your text and looking at the graph above — one could be forgiven for suspecting that the one-child policy actually increased fertility temporarily, since it rose slightly just after it was implemented. One might suppose that in the early years, while the ponderous machinery of state rolled out the complex, unfair, and well-nigh unenforceable law, a fair number of people got in an extra kid or two before it was too late.

  2. Yue

    Nowadays, there is heated debates going on in China regarding the reform of the one-child policy. Even a lot of Chinese people think the one-child policy led to fertility decline, and the government publicizes the “substantial contribution” of the one-child policy as well. I like Wang Feng and his colleagues’s paper a lot, which has kind of transformed my evaluation of the one-child policy. It is great that you mentioned the misleading message in U.S. media.

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