Health inequality recap

On SCOTUS’s ACA D-Day, here is a quick recap of some health inequality posts.

Percentage of Adults Aged 18-64 Who Did Not Get Needed Prescription Drugs Because of Cost, by Poverty Status: National Health Interview Survey, 1999-2010

From 1,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer over 11 years in Washington, D.C.: The number of days between the discovery of an anomaly and the diagnosis, by race/ethnicity and insurance status.

 

Children with asthma are almost twice as likely as all children to be below the poverty line, and less than half as likely to live at 4-times the poverty line or higher.

 

All groups of countries are showing improvement in maternal mortality rates except the U.S.

The U.S. lags seriously behind almost all European countries on infant mortality (most of which is caused by preterm births, the result of women’s poor health).

Estimated Percentage of Persons Who Delayed Seeking or Did Not Receive Medical Care During the Preceding Year Because of Cost, by Respondent-Assessed Health Status

OK, that’s enough! You can see all the health care related posts here.

3 Comments

Filed under In the news

3 responses to “Health inequality recap

  1. ronjohn63

    The fact that Latino “days from discovery to diagnosis” is so much higher than for white and black women can’t be because of conspiracy by the medical-industrial complex. It’s got to be cultural or personal.

    Regarding maternal and infant mortality, from all your demographic work you should know that the US is so much more diverse than Western Europe. What percentage of the women with poor neonatal health are citizens or legal immigrants, and what portion are illegal?

    Anyway, here’s one way the uber-compassionate NZ keeps their maternal and infant mortality rates down: kick our pregnant foreigners!
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10575739

    Like

  2. Pingback: Health Inequality Recap « Welcome to the Doctor's Office

  3. Pingback: Our Theory of Change Part 1 | One 27 Global Blog

Comments welcome (may be moderated)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s